Künstler

Erich Heckel

Title

Vor der rosa Wand

Year
1953
Category
Material / Technique
Dimensions
Bildmaß 87 × 70 cm
Rahmenmaß 96,5 × 78,8 × 3,5 cm
Acquisition details
Erworben 1966 als Schenkung von Erich Heckel
Credits
Erich Heckel, Vor der rosa Wand, 1953, Tempera auf Leinwand, Brücke-Museum, © VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2019

Exhibitions (selection)

Literature (selection)

  • Erich Heckel. Gemälde, Aquarelle, Zeichnungen, Graphik aus 50 Schaffensjahren, Ausst.-Kat. Städtisches Kunstmuseum, Duisburg, Städtisches Kunstmuseum, Duisburg 1957.

  • Erich Heckel. Zur Vollendung des 80. Lebensjahrzehntes, Ausst.-Kat. Museum Folkwang, Essen, Essen 1963.

  • Werner Stein, Berlin (Hg.), Verzeichnis der zur Eröffnung ausgestellten Werke September 1967 bis März 1968, Ausst.-Kat. Brücke-Museum, Berlin 1967.

  • Magdalena M. Moeller (Hg.), Brücke-Museum Berlin, Malerei und Plastik. Kommentiertes Verzeichnis der Bestände, Hirmer Verlag, München 2006.

  • Magdalena M. Moeller (Hg.), Erich Heckel. Der große Expressionist. Werke aus dem Brücke-Museum Berlin, Ausst.-Kat. Stadthalle und Zehntscheuer Balingen, Hirmer Verlag, München 2013.

Details

Inscription/Signature
Signiert unten rechts: Heckel 53 (Signatur)
Rückseitig auf dem Keilrahmen: Erich Heckel Vor der ... [unleserlich] (Bezeichnung)
rückseitig auf dem Rahmen: Heckel. Karlsruhe (Bezeichnung)

Inventory Number
12/66

Catalog Number
Vogt 1953 / 3; Hüneke 1953-3

(Dominique Grisard)

Pink

Girls today seem to be naturally attracted to the colour pink. Historical research, however, proves that pink has only recently become a girl’s colour. Throughout the 19th century, it was virtually impossible to tell little girls and boys apart by the colour of their clothes. In fact, as late as the 1940s, both middle-class girls and boys were dressed in pink and other pastel shades. It was not at all uncommon to come across pictures of “boys’ clothing in pink merino” adorned with pink bows in women’s fashion magazines such as Peterson’s. In fact, until well into the 20th century, there were cultures that considered pink to be a lighter gradation of red and associated this with the blood of war (whereas light blue was the colour in which the Virgin Mary was most often depicted in Christian iconography). Pink was thus considered appropriate for boys. Even until the end of the Second World War, middle-class boys and girls were dressed in decidedly similar colours. Childhood was considered a time of innocence in middle-class and upper-class circles, and their innocence seemed most likely to be preserved by avoiding unduly gendering them by means of colour and clothing. Paintings of little boys dressed in pink, such as Thomas Gainsborough’s The Pink Boy (1782), were consequently neither rare nor strange.

From: Dominique Grisard, “Die Un*Möglichkeiten von Rosa”, in: Nici Jost, Instinctive Desire, edition fink, Zürich 2019, p. 124.

(Dominique Grisard )
Pink
(Isabel Fischer )
About the Work
(Sandra Burkhardt, Miriam Rainer )
Pretext: "Pink"
(ميريام راينر وساندرا بوركاردت )
قوائم
(Dieter Frey )
Collecting from a psychological perspective
(Marwa ) Memories
00:38
(Marwa ) Femininity
00:26
(Miriam ) Very first glance
00:17
(Miriam ) Stolen
00:16
(Miriam ) Dealing
00:08
(Sandra ) Magical
00:26
(Sandra ) Try hard
00:20
Associations
00:39
Questions
00:20
(ميريام ، ساندرا ، مروة )
أسئلة
أفكار ذات صلة
Imprint